FAQs

Q?

What is a paver?

A.

“Paver” is the industry term for brick. At Apex, we work with all kinds of pavers — concrete, clay, and natural flagstone. Concrete pavers today come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes, some of which rival natural stone in creating a premium look. We’ll help you choose which material will most suit your needs and budget. We’ll design the shape of the patio with the same stylish sensibilities.

Q?

How long do Apex patios last?

A.

Paver and flagstone patios, when installed correctly, hold up very well over the years. In fact, a properly installed patio should last over 10 years without the need for major repairs. At Apex, we install 8″-10″ of compacted base material underneath our patios, well over the manufacturer’s recommended minimum of 4″. We also use extra large compactors, which few companies own. We don’t believe that a smaller compactor can do an adequate job. The base preparation is the most important part of an Apex patio, and we don’t skimp on it. We want our patios to last a LONG time!

It is extremely rare for a portion of our patios to settle. We have patios that have been in the field over ten years which look as good today as the day we laid them. However, in the rare case that settling occurs, it will probably happen over the first winter. Typically, in a case like that, we can remove a few square feet of affected pavers, add a little sand, and put the pavers back. That’s why our warranty covers you for two full winters just to be sure everything is solid. At Apex, we want you to feel very secure in your investment.

Q?

Are pavers better than poured concrete?

A.

As the old joke goes, there are two types of concrete: concrete that is cracked, and concrete that is going to crack.

Concrete and stamped concrete don’t have a heavily compacted base foundation beneath them like our patios do. The freeze-thaw cycle flexes a patio severely, and there’s no way for a big solid slab to withstand it. Paver and stone patios can flex, which solid-poured slabs cannot. The reason concrete has those cut lines in it is so the cracks form initially in the cuts, and not on the slab top. These cracks will happen right away over the first winter. Soon enough the main slab cracks too, separates, becomes unlevel, and there’s no way to repair it invisibly. Poured concrete can only be torn out entirely and replaced. We tear out old concrete all the time.

A “quality” concrete installation nowadays costs about the same price as pavers or stone. Concrete prices have come up a lot in the last 6-7 years due to fuel costs, and the cost of the aggregate in the concrete itself. Regular concrete from a quality installer is now $5-7/s.f., and stamped goes from $12-18/s.f. Stamped concrete almost always costs more than pavers, and it will crack just as badly as a normal concrete slab. Even if they install lots of extra rebar, while it delays the cracking, it adds to the overall cost. You could have had pavers or stone for less.

Pavers, on the other hand, have a thick solid base under them, and the surface is made of interlocked pieces which can flex independently with a freeze and thaw. They are cured in ovens, so their psi strength is typically triple that of a concrete slab. If they do crack, individual pieces can always be removed and reset or replaced, without disrupting the entire patio. Stone is on the same solid base and can also withstand winter flexing. With apologies to the poured concrete industry, I just don’t think their product can compete with pavers or stone in terms of cost, attractiveness, or durability.

Q?

How much do patio pavers cost?

A.

First off, for an accurate estimate, please contact us directly via the web site or by phone at: (734) 981-4223. We can usually give you a rough idea over the phone for a simple patio installation, and then schedule a time to meet at your home to give you a precise estimate.

That said, you can use the following pricing guidelines to give you a general estimate:

Paver Patios: Most paver patios and sidewalks, depending on size and paver selection, will fall between $12-20/square foot. (Although there are some ultra-premium pavers which will cost slightly more, if you choose them for your project.)

Flagstone Patios: (Bluestone, Limestone, etc.) No matter which flagstone or layout you choose, it’s unlikely you’d pay less than $21/s.f.or more than $36/s.f. Flagstone is harder to generalize because there are so many different kinds, layouts, and allowances for different gap widths.

These patio cost ranges assume hiring a reliable patio installer who has the proper equipment and experience to build a patio that will last.